All posts filed under: life

Why people hate February

Most people like February. It’s a short month and in Singapore, it’s Chinese New Year. But in particular, I think it serves as a sad reminder that January has come and gone. And the realisation that the resolutions that you made might not come to pass. I’ve started working on my 5000 word fiction story. It’s based on a story I heard today from an old secondary school friend. It’s inspired by a true crime based in Singapore. I want to share it with you soon. In meantime, here’s the crazy thing I did in January. Riding G-Max with my dear friend, Valerie.  

Reflecting on 2015 and new beginnings

I can’t believe it’s 2016. Last year on this day, we were on a train back to Taipei from Hsinchu, in Taiwan. Lugging a backpack with all the belongings I’d needed, getting ready to finally come back home to Singapore and start my next adventure. It’s been a tough year emotionally. Mainly because I didn’t keep promises I made to myself. There have been many great opportunities and transitions in 2015, and if I had to give a theme to my life this year, it’d be “The Year I Settled Back In Singapore. For Good.” It’s strange because I thought that long-term travelling doesn’t really change you. But it did, it made me see that no matter where I was I could be doing what I’d actually wanted to do in Singapore, with abundant opportunity and no stress of having to cover for rent. It’s where my family, my friends, Reuben is. There is no urge for me to leave right now. It’s mostly about analysis-paralysis, my fear of failure and procrastination. Philosophy has been a major source …

Twelve Crazy Things in 2016

It just hit me that it’s 2016 next year. The final year of my 20s. Yes, I’ll be 29 in 2016. To commemorate the blast of a ride I’ve had, I’ve decided to list 12 crazy/things-I’ve-always-wanted-to-do-but-haven’t in 2016. I’ll do one thing a month. Sounds do-able, right? Here are my 12 things for 12 months of 2016: Update: 2.30am, Friday, 23 September. Dye my hair a totally different and new color I’ve never had. Get red / grey highlights. Just cause. (Done) Learn how to draw. I signed up for a Visual Diary Workshop by Public Garden: http://www.public-garden.com/projects/workshop/visual-diary-travellers-workshop-goh-huiying-0 (Done) Write everyday for a month and publish it here. It could be a sentence. A paragraph. An essay. But write. I. Must. (TO DO) Write a 5,000 word short story or essay. (WIP) Go sky diving in New Zealand. (Went to NZ but didn’t skydive – half done, will have to do Sentosa version instead) Register a company. Any company. (TO DO) Learn how to cook 5 fancy dishes properly. (WIP) Ngoh Hiang // Pork Lasagne // Udon Noodles …

Society’s Crazy Demands Of Our Generation

Society’s demands on our generation are crazy. I graduated at age 24, slightly older than my peers because I spent an extra year in university for exchange programs. I’m 28 now, just shy of 2 years to hitting the big 30, but it made me think a lot about what I’m expected to achieve by then. I’ve always thought of 30 as a definitive milestone in life. This is the age where you are supposed to know what you want to do with your life. By now you are expected to have found a life partner, bought a house, get married, have your first kid, achieved some sort of career milestone, lived out all your crazy adventures such as travelling the world, or exited your startup by selling it for millions. Maybe it’s because of the pressure from friends that I hang out with, or the people I look up to, but damn, that’s a lot to have accomplish by 30. When I look at what I’ve done, it’s easy to feel dejected. Wtf have I achieved? I haven’t started …

It’s a joy to watch people do good work

Left: Dedicated kopi-uncle who makes the best kopi in Hong Lim Hawker Center There’s this kopi-uncle working in Hong Lim Hawker Center. Everyday I get kopi from him and it’s pure joy to watch him make coffee. What sets this uncle apart from the rest of the kopi-uncles is his dedication to making a perfect cup of coffee each time. He douses hot water on the cup, whirls it around and throws it out to make sure it’s clean. Then he goes on to make the best cup of kopi, making sure everything is properly stirred and the coffee is a good brew, even if it might take a little longer than what other stalls require. It’s not hard to see that he’s truly enjoying it as well. I guess that’s why people don’t mind waiting in line to get their daily fix of coffee. As I sip on my Kopi-C now, it’s a good reminder that no matter what you do, making the best of your craft is an important facet to enjoying what you do. And …